Techblog

Adding four custom status LEDs to the EPIA MII

In the course of my little EPIA MII project, I have to interface four custom LEDs which I connected to the MII’s internal parallel port connector. The LEDs are tri-state LEDs, that is, they can not be just turned on or off but can show three different colors, hence the name tri-state LEDs. The particular ones I bought can be either off or light in either green, orange or yellow. Naturally, green would be a good choice to indicate a “ready/everything’s right” condition, orange could indicate ongoing activity und yellow is a good candidate in case of errors. Each LED requires two pins plus a Ground connection, thus the eight data lines on the parallel port can drive four LEDs just fine.

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What’s the EPIA MII supposed to do?

Due to its connectivity options (Ethernet onboard, WLAN addable via PCI card, CardBus slot or USB for UMTS adapter, possibly even a CompactFlash adapter) the EPIA MII suggests itself, of course, as a router device and that’s what it was originally intended for. However, now in the first place it’ll have a slightly different assignment.

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My EPIA MII-based system

I recently mentioned my EPIA MII-based system. The EPIA MII is a highly integrated mainboard from Via’s Embedded division that comes in the itsy-tiny Mini-ITX form factor. I originally bought it way back together with a Casetronic Travla C158 case to be the base for an OpenWrt-based UMTS router. However I never got around it to it.

Now recently I rediscovered the hardware and started playing around with it again. But before I go into details about my plans with the system, here’s some pictures first:

Google TechTalk-Presentation on CoreBoot

While (after years) re-checking out the possibilities to get the built-in CompactFlash slot of my EPIA MII board (which I’ll blabla about in a later post) bootable, I stumbled over this really interesting YouTube capture of a Google TechTalk on Coreboot, a project aiming at providing an Open Source alternative to the common PC BIOS:

Hacking the Netgear WG102 Access Point

This article describes my experiences while conducting some reverse engineering of the Netgear WG102 firmware. For one thing, you might learn something about the approaches and methods useful when you want to find out “how they did that” (they = the device’s manufacturer) in general, on the other hand there is also a lot of WG102 resp. Netgear-specific information in here, of course.

This article describes my experiences while conducting some reverse engineering of the Netgear WG102 firmware. For one thing, you might learn something about the approaches and methods useful when you want to find out “how they did that” (they = the device’s manufacturer) in general, on the other hand there is also a lot of WG102 resp. Netgear-specific information in here, of course.

Continue reading “Hacking the Netgear WG102 Access Point”